Harvard President Claudine Gay now faces a Congressional investigation into dozens of allegations of plagiarism that have surfaced since her derided testimony at the Capitol on campus anti-Semitism. 

Harvard launched a probe into claims that Gay plagiarized some of her academic work in October – months before the accusations publicly emerged, the Ivy League has revealed. 

The House Committee on Education and the Workforce announced in a letter that it’s widening the scope of it’s probe into Gay, according to a letter written by Rep. Virginia Foxx.

‘The House Committee on Education and the Workforce (Committee) has begun a review of Harvard University’s (Harvard) handling of credible allegations of plagiarism by President Claudine Gay over a period of 24 years,’ Foxx writes.

‘An allegation of plagiarism by a top school official at any university would be reason for concern, but Harvard is not just any university. It styles itself as one of the top educational institutions in the country,’ the letter, which was signed by dozens of members of Congress, continues.

Harvard President Claudine Gay now faces a Congressional investigation into dozens of allegations of plagiarism that have surfaced since her derided testimony at the Capitol on campus anti-Semitism

Top Republicans have already called for withholding billions in federal funding to universities supportive of anti-Semitism in order to root out the ‘rot’ in American higher education. 

‘If a university is willing to look the other way and not hold faculty accountable for engaging in academically dishonest behavior, it cheapens its mission and the value of its education,’ Foxx added.

The letter follows a complaint containing nearly 40 allegations of plagiarism by President Gay arrived at the university’s Research Integrity Office Tuesday, according to the Washington Free Beacon

The examples span seven publications authored by Gay and include missing quotation marks or entire paragraphs lifted from other sources. 

They range from missing quotation marks around a few phrases or sentences to entire paragraphs lifted verbatim. 

Last week, Gay submitted two corrections to articles where she was accused of plagiarism, adding ‘quotation marks and citations,’ a university spokesman said. 

In a Substack post, investigative journalist Christopher Rufo reported that Gay had plagiarized portions of four works over 24 years, including her 1997 Ph.D dissertation and a series of articles.

The university investigated the plagiarism allegations, and, on Friday, said corrections had been made. 

The House Committee on Education and the Workforce announced in a letter that it's widening the scope of it's probe into Gay, according to a letter written by Rep. Virginia Foxx

The House Committee on Education and the Workforce announced in a letter that it’s widening the scope of it’s probe into Gay, according to a letter written by Rep. Virginia Foxx

'The House Committee on Education and the Workforce (Committee) has begun a review of Harvard University's (Harvard) handling of credible allegations of plagiarism by President Claudine Gay over a period of 24 years,' Foxx writes

‘The House Committee on Education and the Workforce (Committee) has begun a review of Harvard University’s (Harvard) handling of credible allegations of plagiarism by President Claudine Gay over a period of 24 years,’ Foxx writes

The corrections were made to a 2017 article titled ‘A Room for One’s Own? The Partisan Allocation of Affordable Housing,’ in the Urban Affairs Review.

A 2001 article titled ‘The Effect of Black Congressional Representation on Political Participation’ in the American Political Science Review was also amended.

While the board says they found no violation of the school’s policies in Gay’s work, The Harvard Crimson, which reviewed the examples of alleged plagiarism, landed at a different conclusion.

The school’s paper wrote that some of Gay’s writings ‘appear to violate Harvard’s current policies around plagiarism and academic integrity.’

It comes after the Washington Free Beacon and right-wing bloggers Rufo and Christopher Brunet claimed Gay plagiarized parts of four academic works, including her 1994 Ph.D. dissertation at Harvard, titled ‘Taking Charge: Black Electoral Success and the Redefinition of American Politics.’

Billionaire Bill Ackman amplified the allegations as part of his campaign to oust Gay from his alma mater’s top job. 

Gay defended her work telling The Boston Globe: ‘I stand by the integrity of my scholarship. Throughout my career, I have worked to ensure my scholarship adheres to the highest academic standards.’

While the bloggers focused their claims on Gay’s dissertation, The Free Beacon also looked at three other works by the scholar: a 1993 essay in the publication Origins and two papers from 2012 and 2017, when Gay was already a Harvard professor.

While some of the claims by the Free Beacon include minor citation issues, the Crimson said others are ‘are more substantial, including some paragraphs and sentences nearly identical to other work and lacking citations.’

Gay was accused of copying two paragraphs from work by then-Harvard scholars D. Stephen Voss and Bradley Palmquist. One paragraph is nearly identical except for a few words

Gay was accused of copying two paragraphs from work by then-Harvard scholars D. Stephen Voss and Bradley Palmquist. One paragraph is nearly identical except for a few words

However, Gay did not use any quotation marks or in-text citations - Voss and Palmquist are not cited anywhere in her dissertation

However, Gay did not use any quotation marks or in-text citations – Voss and Palmquist are not cited anywhere in her dissertation

D. Stephen Voss, who now teaches at the University of Kentucky, told The Crimson that while Gay 'technically plagiarized,' it is 'minor-to-inconsequential'

D. Stephen Voss, who now teaches at the University of Kentucky, told The Crimson that while Gay ‘technically plagiarized,’ it is ‘minor-to-inconsequential’

The student publication notes Harvard’s rule on what constitutes plagiarism says when copying language ‘word for word,’ scholars ‘must give credit to the author of the source material, either by placing the source material in quotation marks and providing a clear citation, or by paraphrasing the source material and providing a clear citation.’

Gay was accused of copying two paragraphs from work by then-Harvard scholars D. Stephen Voss and Bradley Palmquist. One paragraph is nearly identical except for a few words.

However, Gay did not use any quotation marks or in-text citations – Voss and Palmquist are not cited anywhere in her dissertation. 

It’s unclear whether the same rules applied when Gay turned in her dissertation in 1997. 

But Voss, who now teaches at the University of Kentucky, told The Crimson that while Gay ‘technically plagiarized,’ it is ‘minor-to-inconsequential.’

He said: ‘This doesn’t at all look sneaky… It looks like maybe she just didn’t have a sense of what we normally tell students they’re supposed to do and not do.’

Harvard professor Lawrence Lobo, one of those allegedly plagiarized by Gay, similarly told the Boston Globe: ‘I find myself unconcerned about these claims as our work was explicitly acknowledged.’

Backlash erupted after the presidents of Harvard, UPenn and MIT failed to unequivocally condemn the genocide of Jews during a hearing on anti-Semitism on Capitol Hill earlier this month.

Now top Republicans are calling for withholding all federal funding to Harvard and other liberal universities supportive of anti-Semitism.

Harvard has received over $3 billion in taxpayer dollars between 2018 and 2022 and also enjoys tax breaks on its massive endowment. Between those same years, Harvard’s endowment totaled over $50 billion, of which $2 billion got special tax treatment, according to an OpenTheBooks analysis. 

‘We must DEFUND the rot in America’s higher education,’ House GOP Chairwoman Elise Stefanik told DailyMail.com in a statement Thursday. 

She is pledging to ‘cut off’ schools that are encouraging anti-Semitism from receiving federal funds.

Harvard President Claudine Gay is still in power despite backlash about her testimony last week

Harvard President Claudine Gay is still in power despite backlash about her testimony last week

Stefanik put the liberal university's presidents in the hot seat - asking them whether 'calling for the genocide of Jews' would violate their schools' codes of conducts

Stefanik put the liberal university’s presidents in the hot seat – asking them whether ‘calling for the genocide of Jews’ would violate their schools’ codes of conducts

The top Republican called it ‘unacceptable and unAmerican’ that taxpayer dollars are going to universities whose students and staff have ‘openly called for the genocide of Jews.’

Last week, Stefanik put the liberal university presidents in the hot seat – asking them whether ‘calling for the genocide of Jews’ would violate their schools’ codes of conducts.

She directly asked Harvard President Claudine Gay if ‘calling for the genocide of Jews violate Harvard’s rules of bullying and harassment? Yes or no.’

‘It can be depending on the context,’ replied Gay. She has since received numerous calls to step down following her failure to directly condemn anti-Semitism.

UPenn President Liz Magil and MIT President Sally Kornbluth gave similar non-responses to Stefanik during the hearing. 

‘If the speech turns into conduct it can be harassment, yes,’ UPenn President Liz Magill told Stefanik last week. 

Pressed further, she said: ‘It is a context-dependent decision, congresswoman.’ 

UPenn’s Liz Magill was forced to resign following the backlash, but Harvard has continued to back up its president Claudine Gay. 

The Harvard Corporation, which governs the university, announced they wanted her to stay on as president – despite her December 5 testimony before Congress. 

And Gay has been told that the university leadership still supports her, in the face of calls for her to resign. 

Gay apologized for her remarks as the backlash intensified, telling college newspaper The Crimson she ‘got caught up in what had become at that point, an extended, combative exchange about policies and procedures.’ 

House Majority Leader Steve Scalise, R-La., has called on her to resign and says taxpayer dollars going to Harvard and other universities must be re-examined.

‘President Gay’s testimony was deplorable, and she should resign,’ said Scalise to DailyMail.com.

‘It is obvious we need a full investigation into whether universities that receive taxpayer dollars are enabling a culture of antisemitism and discrimination on campus, and I am glad that the Education and Workforce Committee is initiating that probe.’ 

On Wednesday evening, the House voted on a resolution to condemn anti-Semitism on college campuses and the testimonies of the presidents last week.

The vote cleared 303-126 and 125 Democrats joined only one Republican – Rep. Thomas Massie, Ky., – in voting ‘no.’ 

Stefanik and Scalise lead the measure along with Democrats Jared Moskowitz and Josh Gottheimer. 

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